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JAY DEE JOHNS III

Professional Focus

EDUCATE AND DEVELOP!

Educate myself on best practices for developing video games and interactive applications.
Educate and develop design students into tomorrow’s industry leaders.

 

Proficiencies

GAME DESIGN

APP  DESIGN

UX/UI DESIGN

PROTOTYPING

PROJECT MANAGEMENT

QUALITY ASSURANCE

AUDIOBOOK CREATION

CONSULTING

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About Jay

The creative process of designing keeps me up late at night and what inspires me to get up for the morning drive to work. I am grateful for the privilege of watching a design take shape and come to life.

Being able to teach or advise anyone interested in making video games helps build community and the increase the quality of products, especially from independent developers.

 

Jay Johns currently lives in Fort Wayne, Indiana.

 
 

LIMITED TERM LECTURER, PURDUE UNIVERSITY FORT WAYNE

AUGUST 2019 – PRESENT

Teaching Human-Computer Interaction using Adobe XD. 

MANAGING MEMBER, 3R INTERACTIVE, LLC

APRIL 2012 – DECEMBER 2020

We create video games, mobile applications with a focus on education, books, audiobooks, and podcasts.

  • Maintain communication with clients and contractors

  • Manage tasks, set milestones, and ensure projects are completed in a timely manner for in-house and contracted projects

  • Implement UX/UI techniques and user-centered design

  • Create digital artwork and audio files for clients, such as school districts and authors

ADJUNCT INSTRUCTOR, UNIVERSITY OF SAINT FRANCIS

AUGUST 2018 – MAY 2020

Teaching 2D and 3D game development and game theory courses using the Unity GameEngine.

ADJUNCT INSTRUCTOR, ITT TECHNICAL INSTITUTE

SEPTEMBER 2011 - DECEMBER 2015

Participated in the creation of ITT Technical Institute’s Intellicourse. Taught Video Game Design courses, including: 

  • User Interface Design

  • After Effects

  • Level Design

  • Animation

  • 3D Modeling

  • Instructional Design

  • Game Design Documents

  • Use of Game Engines

  • Flash Programming

  • Rapid Visualization

  • Quality Assurance

QUALITY ASSURANCE SPECIALIST, DIGITAL DREAM FORGE

JANUARY 2011 – MAY 2011

  • Maintained compliance with Sony 1st Party Standards

  • Located and tracked defects

  • Documented findings in a bug tracking database

  • Worked independently and in groups 

QUALITY ASSURANCE SPECIALIST, THQ INC.

JUNE – NOVEMBER 2010

  • Located and tracked defects

  • Documented findings in a bug tracking database

  • Worked independently and in groups 

PROJECT MANAGER, MOONLITE GAMES

OCTOBER 2009 – MAY 2010

  • Developed websites and mobile applications (Android, iPhone, iPad) for businesses

  • Coordinated social media outlets

  • Brand management

  • Assured all projects completed timely 

QUALITY ASSURANCE, D3 PUBLISHER OF AMERICA, INC.

APRIL 2007 – OCTOBER 2009

  • Prepared Ben 10: Protector of Earth’s walkthrough

  • Helped ship 10+ titles on SONY PSP, SONY PS3, Microsoft Xbox 360, Nintendo DS, and Nintendo Wii consoles

  • Troubleshot issues with purchased games

  • Responsible for 1st Party Standards for US and European versions of the PS3, PSP, Nintendo Wii, Nintendo DS, and Xbox 360 titles 

Educational Experience

 

MS, INDIANA UNIVERSITY - INDIANAPOLIS, IN

2017

Human-Computer Interaction Degree

BA, COLLINS COLLEGE - PHOENIX, AZ

2009

Video Game Design Degree

Awarded: Salutatorian

Publications

 

STRATEGIC DESIGN: BREAKING MENTAL MODELS INITIATES LEARNING IN VIDEO GAMES [PUBLISHED BY SPRINGER]

JUNE 2017

An important part of all digital design is effective communication with users. Video game designers, compared to other types of digital designers, have much that they need to communicate within games. As a game progresses, there are often more incrementally challenging mechanics for the player to encounter and experience. By briefly explaining the more traditional methods of educating game players, I will explain how game designers can draw from user experience frameworks to improve gameplay by teaching players in both subtle and dramatic ways with the use of mental models. Perhaps most commonly, mental models have been used to describe and analyze user satisfaction, particularly among digital technologies such as websites. Although there are some key similarities between these types of technologies and video games, significant differences do emerge, although many parallels can still be drawn. I will first explain how video game designers can strategically utilize the lessons learned from previous design researchers. Then, I will explain how and when these models should be broken. By drawing on expectancy violation theory and game design strategies, I argue that purposely violating a player’s mental models can prime the player for learning in order to expand his understanding of the game world. After several case studies, I will then provide guidance to game designers who want to implement a disruptive mental model approach to educating players.

CLASSROOM GAMIFICATION: MERGING GAME DESIGN THEORY AND BEHAVIOR ANALYSIS FOR INCREASED ENGAGEMENT [PUBLISHED BY SPRINGER]

MAY 2018

Many instructors have added gamification to the classroom with the intention of increasing student engagement to promote student achievement. Gamification is a process by which non-game activities are designed to be more like a game. Thus far, the implemented designs of classroom gamification are influenced by methods used in video games such as earning points, badges, and advancing to new levels. These techniques have demonstrated some success in increasing student engagement at various age levels; we believe there is more to explore in order to maximize classroom participation and retention of academic information. This is an introductory paper that explores video game design theory through the lens of behavior analysis with the intention of utilizing game design to increase student engagement in the college classroom. We designed a gamified classroom by implementing video game design theory, then had the model critiqued by a professional behavior analyst using a behavior analytic framework. With the inclusion of behavior analytic research and video game design theory, our goal with this paper is to analyze classroom engagement of college age neurotypical students who are attending a gamified classroom. Additionally, we will provide suggestions for modifying existing instructional strategies to support the creation of gamified classrooms.

DESIGNING PLAYER DEATH: USING INTENTION AND MEANING TO ADD DEPTH [FEATURED ON GAMASUTRA]

DECEMBER 2017

A series of questions and examples I use to inspire creativity while designing fail states. I hope this can be useful for anyone that wants to be more innovative when dealing with player death.

DEMON WINTERS [SELF PUBLISHED ON AMAZON]

MARCH 2014

Jack Frost invades Hell. Intriguing right? Well, hold onto your hats, there is more to this story. Demon Winters follows Dee - a pudgy, slacker, emo, and a want-to-be poet all wrapped up into a husky, hoofed Hellion. As he sets out on an adventure with his trusty shovel and treasured journal, overcoming the new snow covered landscape while battling foreign ice creatures of legend to restore Hell from the icy grip of Jack Frost.

Origins of the Demon Winters Book: 
Demon Winters was originally a video game idea that we wanted to make in 2009. But like 90% of all game design ideas we never got to it. Recently, we started looking through some of the old game design documents and realized that we should make this into a book since we would mostly likely never make the video game. We wanted tell the story of what happens to Dee (the emo demon) as he fights his way through the now frozen terrain of Hell once Jack Frost invaded.

View Publication

STRATEGIC DESIGN: BREAKING MENTAL MODELS INITIATES LEARNING IN VIDEO GAMES [PUBLISHED BY SPRINGER]

JUNE 2017

An important part of all digital design is effective communication with users. Video game designers, compared to other types of digital designers, have much that they need to communicate within games. As a game progresses, there are often more incrementally challenging mechanics for the player to encounter and experience. By briefly explaining the more traditional methods of educating game players, I will explain how game designers can draw from user experience frameworks to improve gameplay by teaching players in both subtle and dramatic ways with the use of mental models. Perhaps most commonly, mental models have been used to describe and analyze user satisfaction, particularly among digital technologies such as websites. Although there are some key similarities between these types of technologies and video games, significant differences do emerge, although many parallels can still be drawn. I will first explain how video game designers can strategically utilize the lessons learned from previous design researchers. Then, I will explain how and when these models should be broken. By drawing on expectancy violation theory and game design strategies, I argue that purposely violating a player’s mental models can prime the player for learning in order to expand his understanding of the game world. After several case studies, I will then provide guidance to game designers who want to implement a disruptive mental model approach to educating players.

 

SCOTT ADAMS

"Creativity is allowing yourself to make mistakes. Art is knowing which ones to keep."

Let's Connect

I love what I do and I’d love to share it with you. Send me a message and I’ll get back to you ASAP.

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